Circular Economy. no-plastics revisited: Supermarket chain tries again

Photo: Iceland

no-plastics revisited:

Supermarket chain tries again

Thomas Reiner | 19.09.2019

Recently, UK supermarket chain Iceland had to end an attempt to sell fruit and vegetables without plastic packaging. The reason: a sharp decline in sales. Now the company is trying again.

In spring 2019, Iceland launched two pilot projects on sustainability and plastics prevention in selected UK supermarkets.
• For instance, bananas were no longer wrapped in foil but rather with a paper band.
• In addition, 35 fruit and vegetable products were offered unpacked.
• Another 27 presented themselves in new, sustainable packaging such as compostable bags, paper bags and cellulosic nets.

Iceland reverted back after only three months. Obviously, consumers did not accept the new alternatives. Sales of the previous goods had fallen by 20 percent.

Nevertheless, the company is sticking to its conviction. In July, a new attempt was made to offer bananas “plastic-free” – with a test run in 20 supermarkets. Also a new attempt with unpacked fruits and vegetables should start later this year.

According to the company, it is looking closely at discounters in Germany, who are showing how it can be done.

It is therefore remarkable how Iceland is sticking to its sustainability convictions and trying again, despite a sharp fall in sales following the move of going plastics-free with some of its products. True sustainability starts in the DNA of a company, growing from the inside out.
That is in line with our mission at B+P, striving to assist companies in becoming truly sustainable and ultimately fit for the circular economy, especially regarding their processes and communications, as well as their packaging. Sustainability is our passion. We would love to build on your ideas. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

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It’s time to put a freeze on plastics

Video-Interview with Managing Director Richard Walker

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Circular Economy. McDonald’s: Innovative recycling of to-go cups and fewer disposable items

Source: McDonald’s Deutschland

McDonald’s:

Innovative recycling of to-go cups and fewer disposable items

Thomas Reiner | 11.09.2019

Following the recent test of a model restaurant for waste and plastic prevention, McDonald’s is taking further steps towards sustainability: with the abolition of the first single-use plastic articles, reduced packaging volume and an innovative Pioneering action in the recycling of togo beverage paper cups.

Less plastic
From October, McDonald’s plans to replace the plastic holders of the balloons with paper variants.

Less packaging volume
By the end of the year, the four packs of Chicken McNuggets will be served in-house in a paper bag. The bag replaces previously used paper folding boxes.

Innovative paper cup recycling
Together with its logistics partner Havi, McDonald’s is breaking new ground in recycling the paper beverage cups. Since April of this year, the cups have been collected separately and processed into drywall walls in a material recycling. In addition, a pilot project is testing the preparation for hygiene paper.
Around 1,000 tonnes of paper cups are to be recycled each year.

McDonald’s claims to be the first company in Germany to recycle disposable cups.

Two months ago, we reported on an experiment by McDonald’s with the “Model Restaurant for Reducing Waste and Plastic.” You can read the packaging alternatives tested there in our B+P Game Changer blog.

The sustainability initiatives lead by McDonalds are a good step in the right direction, but one must evaluate these with precaution. In order to achieve more in the end than just a successful image campaign, the sustainability aspect of the packaging has to be fully thought through, planned and implemented holistically from the very first product idea.

That is precisely our mission at B+P, striving to assist companies in becoming fit for the circular economy, especially regarding their processes and communications, as well as their packaging. Sustainability is part of our DNA and is our passion. We would love to build on your thoughts and talk about it. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

We love building on your ideas

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Digital Transformation. On-pack AR on eco-refill packaging from Unilever

 Source: Unilever – Cif

On-pack AR on eco-refill packaging from Unilever

Thomas Reiner | 05.09.2019

Unilever uses augmented reality (AR) for its new eco-refill packaging for its household cleaner Cif. The move is part of Unilever’s strategy to develop new offerings for cross-linked always-on packaging. AR is a key element of this strategy.

Unilever wants to consistently use packaging as an always-on media channel in order to address and activate consumers at the point of product use. Augmented reality should be part of the integrated marketing activities and not an isolated one-off activity.

By using AR, one wants to make sure that the content and information one provides is always relevant and highly attractive. In order to achieve this, AR has to contribute positively to the customer experience and deliver real added value.

Unilever launches its on-pack AR on the eco-refill packaging for the Cif detergent The refill packaging is, according to the company, an innovation in the Household Products segment. Consumers can refill their already used spray bottles with an “eco-refill”.

The augmented reality offer provides instructions on how to refill and how to reuse unnecessary spray bottles, as well as information on some “surprises” not yet revealed at the time of the report.

Five key contexts have been identified for the use of augmented reality on packaging:

  1. Communicating transparency and messages on sustainability and recycling
  2. Storytelling
  3. Demonstrations of the practical application of the product
  4. Promotions and games
  5. Social sharing activities such as face filters.

For the own enterprise with the employment of augmented reality on the packaging one aspires a higher meaning and value of the brand for the consumer. In addition, one learns a lot about the consumer experience of one’s own brand. These learnings can be used well to further optimize the experience.

Another plus is that one can offer customers more shopping options. For example, via connected eCommerce pages – provided AR is used as part of an integrated and networked packaging programme.

In future, Unilever expects to provide consumers with personalized and dynamic content through packaging platforms.

When it comes to packaging as a media platform and the Internet of Packaging (IoP), we would love to hear from you and build on your ideas, as we find the topic most engaging. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

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Circular Economy. Re:Cycle: Used coffee capsules become bicycles

Source: Vélosophy – RE:CYCLE

Re:Cycle:

Used coffee capsules become bicycles

Thomas Reiner | 03.09.2019

Nestlé and the Swedish bicycle designer Vélosophy are planning a special kind of upcycling: The used aluminium coffee capsules from Nespresso are to find a second life as a frame for design bicycles, significantly called Re:Cycle.

The campaign runs in cooperation with the Swedish bicycle designer Vélosophy. The Re:Cycle special edition is initially limited to 1,000 pieces. The bell comes in the form of a coffee capsule and in the basket on the handlebar are holders for two coffee mugs. The cost of the design bike: 1,290 euros.

Each Re:Cycle bike consists of 2.000 coffee capsules. That sounds like a lot. And yet all 1,000 Re: Cycle bicycles end up with only 0.025% of the world’s annual coffee capsules consumed. It would theoretically have to be 4 million wheels, if one wanted to keep all the coffee capsules in this way in the material cycle.

The Numbers

  • 8 billion coffee capsules are sold annually worldwide.
  • The aluminium of each capsule weighs around 1 gram.
  • 8,000 tons of aluminium waste accumulate annually for all coffee capsules.
  • A bicycle frame made of 6061 aluminium, as used in the Vélosophy bike, weighs around 2 kilograms on average.
  • 2,000 capsules are needed for the production of a frame.
  • 4 million Re:Cycle bicycles would have to be produced for the complete upcycling of all coffee capsules.
  • There will be 1,000 Re:Cyle bikes as part of the campaign.
  • Only 0.025% of the world’s coffee capsules are returned to the material cycle through the campaign.

However, the marketing initiative is a good step in the right direction. In order to achieve more in the end than just an image campaign, the sustainability aspect of the packaging has to be thought through, planned and implemented holistically from the very first product idea.

That is precisely our mission at B+P, striving to assist companies in becoming fit for the circular economy, especially regarding their processes and communications, as well as their packaging. Sustainability is part of our DNA and is our passion. We would love to build on your thoughts and talk about it. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

We love building on your ideas

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