Coronavirus: Virtual product presentations replace Interpack presence. Has the ball started rolling?

Source: freepik.com/pch.vector

Virtual product presentations replace Interpack presence.

Has the ball started rolling?

Thomas Reiner | 06.04.2020

Interpack, K-Messe or LogiMAT are just some of the industry events that have had to be postponed or cancelled in recent weeks due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Basically, all trade fairs worldwide will probably be cancelled until at least autumn 2020.

This is a problem for manufacturers, especially from the mechanical and plant engineering sector. After all, they need the trade fairs as a platform to present their innovations and new products, maintain contacts and generate new leads.

Some are now making a digital virtue out of necessity and setting up their own virtual in-house trade fair, which is streamed over the net.

In this way, the manufacturers are closing a gap – possibly even beyond the current moment. Because they are overcoming a digital hurdle that opens up new avenues for them. The newly created tools will also be available to them in the future and will still be valid when Interpack, K-Messe and Co. are caught up.

It is quite safe to assume that this boost in digital communication will have lasting consequences – on the one hand for marketing and sales on the manufacturer side, but also for the trade fair organisers.

We love building on your ideas

I’m looking forward to hearing from you

12 + 3 =

Coronavirus: Are we turning the clock back? Single-use plastics are suddenly back in demand

Are we turning the clock back?

Single-use plastics is suddenly back in demand

Thomas Reiner | 01.04.2020

In view of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, Starbucks removed returnable cups from its range and switched back to disposable for the time being. At the same time, restaurants and canteens around the world are switching to disposable-to-go packaging in order to be able to serve food outside the home.

In the current crisis, the issue of sustainability is receding into the background. Concerns about hygiene and security of supply dominate people’s consciousness and it is becoming clear how central the role of packaging is in this context.

Ironically, plastics and disposables, which yesterday were considered to be on the dark side of the force, are now shining in a new light. Demand is growing by leaps and bounds.

As an industry, we must now be agile enough to meet this demand. As a society, we must learn to take a more holistic view of sustainability. We need to put sustainability into a broader context that meets environmental, economic and social demands.

This is not about revisionism. Turning the clock back would certainly be exactly the wrong approach. But even blind worship of the circular economy falls short. Health and hygiene, protection and security of supply are integral components of sustainability.

We love building on your ideas

I’m looking forward to hearing from you

6 + 12 =

Coronavirus: The food industry rocks! It’s time to say thanks – and to look ahead

Source: Photo by Austin Kehmeier

The food industry rocks!

It’s time to say thanks – and to look ahead

Thomas Reiner | 30.03.2020

SARS-CoV-2 shakes the world and shows how fragile our system is in many places. We can consider ourselves lucky that at least the food industry is fully up to the task. It’s unbelievable how powerful its chains are and with what reliable continuity it supplies retail and thus all of us with the necessities of life.

In a comparison between the last week of February and the first week of March alone, turnover in German food retail grew by 14 percent. At the top of the sales increase are instant soups (112 %), canned vegetables (80 %), pasta and noodles (73 %) and canned fish and fruit (70 %).

Of course, it’s due to the special situation surrounding the Corona pandemic that the focus is now on products that were not at the top of the popularity list just a few weeks ago.

It wouldn’t be surprising, however, if a good part of the effect would remain with us even after the crisis. After all, “Corona” will certainly lead to a reassessment of aspects such as reliability, safety, hygiene and product protection in products and the supply chain.

As a result, not only current crisis-driven trends such as the desire for more (self-sufficient) regionality and the increased use of delivery services are likely to be part of the collective “learning”. But also that the food industry, which has been scolded and often defamed in recent years, is urgently needed. And even more: That we can rely on it when the dams break on the left and right.

It’s time to pay tribute and say thank you.

We love building on your ideas

I’m looking forward to hearing from you

7 + 10 =

Coronavirus: The packaging industry is systemically relevant. That’s often forgotten, especially by itself

Source: ivan.graphics

The packaging industry is systemically relevant.

That’s often forgotten, especially by itself

Thomas Reiner | 27.03.2020

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is plunging the world into an existential emergency. Especially in times of crisis such as these, the central importance of packaging in ensuring a reliable supply of food, hygiene products and medicines to the population becomes apparent. Because no good reaches its user or consumer without packaging

The basic requirement for the systemically-relevant performance of the packaging industry is that the required raw materials and packaging materials are available and can be delivered in sufficient quantities.

However, the current situation at the borders poses great challenges for international supply chains. Sluggish customs clearance ensures long traffic jams of trucks with urgently needed materials. This threatens the efficiency of the industry and thus the security of supply for the population and the medical infrastructure.

The situation could even worsen if, in the context of pandemic defence, plant closures and work bans are imposed on companies in the packaging industry.

An important reason for this state of affairs is that the companies in the industry have not immediately been covered by the regulations on critical infrastructure and accordingly have not immediately been prioritized in the border management plans of the national states and the EU.

The lack of immediate prioritisation of the packaging industry and its recognition as a systemically important industry is obviously a failure. However, it would be too short-sighted to blame this omission primarily on politics. It’s rather the packaging industry itself that has been failing here for years.

We’ve not managed to make our systemic importance clear. Instead of positioning itself as a systemically-relevant industry and making its own importance not only for food safety but also for hygiene and security of supply clear, the industry is losing itself in island thinking and skirmishes between the material groups. Instead of speaking with a united voice, we still far too often cultivate a cacophonous chorus of – mostly short-term – individual interests.

The current situation is a slap in the face for the industry. It’s self-inflicted and one can only hope that the pain will promote learning. We must act together. And we must live up to our responsibility. Because packaging and the services of the packaging industry are of critical relevance – even more so in times of crisis than they already are.

We love building on your ideas

I’m looking forward to hearing from you

13 + 5 =